Archive for May 3rd, 2006

Importing data from an ASCII file

First refer to Importing data into SPSS. If you have read it, than you can continue below.
Typically, columns of data in an ASCII file are separated by a space, tab, comma, or some other character. SPSS has a Text Import Wizard that will help you import data in an ASCII file format:

1. Select File -> Open -> Data
2. Choose Text as the File Type if your ASCII file has the .txt extension. Otherwise you could choose the option All files
3. Select the file you want to import and click Open

Importing an ASCII file Open File

4. The next thing that will pop up is the Import text wizard. First click Next if your file does not match a predefined format. It probably doesn’t, so click Next.

Importing an ASCII file step 1

5. In step 2, you can set the first question to Delimited. In the second question you choose wether you have a header row or not (are variables names included in the top of the file). After setting the options right, choose Next.

Importing an ASCII file step 2

6. In step 3, set the line where the first case of your data begins (normally on line 1), set how your cases are represented (normally each line represents a case), and how many cases you want to import (choose for yourself, normally you import All of the cases. Click Next.

Importing an ASCII file step 3

7. In step 4, set the delimiters of your file (probably comma or space). If your text has quotes (or anything else) around it, than specify this. In most cases you can just set it to None. As you can see, based on the choices you make here, SPSS already formats the file in the small screen in the bottom. There you can check if everything is set correctly. Choose Next when it looks fine.

Importing an ASCII file step 4

8. In step 5 you can set the specifications for the variables, but you can just skip it if you have already defined your variables or want to do it later.

Importing an ASCII file step 5

9. In step 6 you can just leave all the options as they are, and click Finish. You’re done!

Importing an ASCII file step 6

3 comments May 3rd, 2006 andris

Import data from an Excel file

First refer to Importing data into SPSS. If you have read it, than you can continue below.
Before you start the actual import process, please keep in mind that the Excel file should not be opened in Excel.

1. Select File -> Open -> Data
2. Choose Excel as the File Type
3. Select the file you want to import and click Open

Importing Excel file Open Excel Data Source 

4. The next thing that will pop up is a screen called Opening Excel Data Source. If you use a header row, than tick the option Read variable names from the first row of data. Select the right worksheet you want to import from (the same as the tabs in Excel). If you have no clue, leave it as is. It will probably select the right one automatically. If you do not want to import the whole worksheet, you can use the field Range to define the cells you want to import, otherwise just leave empty. Click OK.

Importing Excel file Open file

SPSS will automatically determine the type of each variable, so after you clicked OK, you are ready!

8 comments May 3rd, 2006 andris

Nominal, ordinal and scale

Today Erik from the Netherlands sent us the following question:

What is the diffrence between nominal, ordinal and scale?

In SPSS you can specify the level of measurement as scale (numeric data on an interval or ratio scale), ordinal, or nominal. Nominal and ordinal data can be either string alphanumeric) or numeric.But what is the difference?

Nominal.
A variable can be treated as nominal when its values represent categories with no intrinsic ranking; for example, the department of the company in which an employee works. Examples of nominal variables include region, zip code, or religious affiliation.A variable can be treated as nominal when its values represent categories with no intrinsic ranking; for example, the department of the company in which an employee works. Examples of nominal variables include region, zip code, or religious affiliation.

Ordinal.
A variable can be treated as ordinal when its values represent categories with some intrinsic ranking; for example, levels of service satisfaction from highly dissatisfied to highly satisfied. Examples of ordinal variables include attitude scores representing degree of satisfaction or confidence and preference rating scores.

A variable can be treated as ordinal when its values represent categories with some intrinsic ranking; for example, levels of service satisfaction from highly dissatisfied to highly satisfied. Examples of ordinal variables include attitude scores representing degree of satisfaction or confidence and preference rating scores.For ordinal string variables, the alphabetic order of string values is assumed to reflect the true order of the categories. For example, for a string variable with the values of low, medium, high, the order of the categories is interpreted as high, low,mediumwhich is not the correct order. In general, it is more reliable to use numeric codes to represent ordinal data.

Scale.
A variable can be treated as scale when its values represent ordered categories with a meaningful metric, so that distance comparisons between values are appropriate. Examples of scale variables include age in years and income in thousands of dollars.A variable can be treated as scale when its values represent ordered categories with a meaningful metric, so that distance comparisons between values are appropriate. Examples of scale variables include age in years and income in thousands of dollars.

(Source: SPSS User Guide)

15 comments May 3rd, 2006

Import data from a tab delimited text file

First refer to Importing data into SPSS. If you have read it, than you can continue below.

1. Select File -> Open -> Data
2. Choose Text as the File Type
3. Select the file you want to import and click Open

Open tab delimited text file

4. The next thing that will pop up is the Import text wizard. First click Next if your file does not match a predefined format. It probably doesn’t, so click Next. :)  

Importing a tab delimited text file step 1

5. In step 2, you can set the first question to Delimited. In the second question you choose wether you have a header row or not (are variables names included in the top of the file). After setting the options right, choose Next.

Importing a tab delimited text file step 2

6. In step 3, set the line where the first case of your data begins (normally on line 1), set how your cases are represented (normally each line represents a case), and how many cases you want to import (choose for yourself, normally you import All of the cases. Click Next.

Importing a tab delimited text file step 3 

7. In step 4, set the delimiters of your file (Tab it would be). If your text has quotes (or anything else) around it, than specify this. In most cases you can just set it to None. As you can see, based on the choices you make here, SPSS already formats the file in the small screen in the bottom. There you can check if everything is set correctly. Choose Next when it looks fine.

Importing a tab delimited text file step 4 

8. In step 5 you can set the specifications for the variables, but you can just skip it if you have already defined your variables or want to do it later. Choose Next.

Importing a tab delimited text file step 5

9. In step 6 you can just leave all the options as they are, and click Finish. You’re done!

Importing a tab delimited text file step 6

3 comments May 3rd, 2006 andris

Importing data into SPSS

Importing some data

If you have a small amount of data you want to get into SPSS, the most easy way is to simply Copy Paste it into SPSS. Be aware to check if everything ends up in the right cell, and if  you really have all the data you need. The most safe way to get this data into SPSS, would be to import it. Especially if you have a lot of data.

Importing a lot of data

There are a number of file formats SPSS can import data from. In general it is handy – but optional – to have a header row in the top of your file with descriptions of the columns. This means that you add one line before all the cases, where you put the name of the column (or variable).

Importing data from an Excel file
Importing data from an ASCII file
Importing data from a tab delimited text file

5 comments May 3rd, 2006 andris


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